WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Krups Burr Grinder or Mini Chopper

Speed to First Woot:
1m 50.330s
First Sucker:
A911owner
Last Wooter to Woot:
ashliecurtis
Last Purchase:
2 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 30% of Home Woots
Top 46% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 6% of Home Woots
Top 15% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 11% first woot
  • 3% second woot
  • 27% < 10 woots
  • 28% < 25 woots
  • 31% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 9% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 13% one year old
  • 76% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 94% bought 1
  • 4% bought 2
  • 2% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

6%
3%
2%
1%
2%
4%
6%
9%
10%
10%
8%
6%
6%
4%
4%
2%
3%
3%
2%
2%
2%
3%
2%
2%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


ckeilah


quality posts: 149 Private Messages ckeilah

For this price, okay, but it's not all it's cracked up to be. Lots of plastic bits to break, and the works get gummed up easily and require cleaning. If you're really picky about your coffee grind, this is not the burr grinder for you. If you only have a chopper, this will improve your coffee significantly.

Please do not increment my Quality Posts count. 69 is a good place to be. ;-)
MOD: We had to...we just HAD TO...

chardonay


quality posts: 29 Private Messages chardonay

Bought this Krups Burr grinder on the weekend from Costco and it was 24.99. Works great but this is a disappointing price. add the freight and its almost 25% more

What Contemptible Scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch??

MyPooka


quality posts: 16 Private Messages MyPooka

This Krups burr grinder will be fine for people wanting to make drip or French press (press pot) coffee. Absolutely not suitable for espresso regardless of what the manual says.

Over 400 reviews at Amazon with about a two and a half star average rating.

Quite a few reviews over at CoffeeGeek also, but I can tell you from experience that the reviews on grinders there are going to tend to be overly critical for any grinder that isn't a conical or flat burr machine costing many hundreds of dollars. In other words, take the reviews at CG with a big grain of salt.

Generally positive review at YouTube...



Bottom line? If you're wanting to grind for espresso, look elsewhere. If you want to grind fresh beans for your drip machine or press pot, this Krups will work fine.

msk3130


quality posts: 1 Private Messages msk3130

Looks like this one is not so good. I just checked price comparison and reviews at amazon and they are mostly negative. I'm holding out for something better.
http://www.amazon.com/Krups-GVX1-14-KRUPS-Burr-Grinder/product-reviews/B0001I9R8C

christybluefish


quality posts: 1 Private Messages christybluefish

I bought this Burr Grinder at Costco for $25 thinking it would be nice to have at the office as it is smaller than the Cuisinart $50 unit I have at home. Mistake.
The reservoir holds maybe 20 "cups" worth of beans (two to three brews-worth of coffee) and you end up having to refill it far more often than you want to. This alone would be tolerable, however the feed mechanism in the reservoir is finicky enough that you MUST stand guard while it grinds so that you can pick the entire unit up and shake it to continue grinding when it jams.
The deal-killer is that once it finishes and you remove the ground coffee, a fine dusting of coffee drops out onto your counter and onto everything around, as the container IS the bottom of the grinder. There is no ledge or other "bottom" below the container to catch the inevitable last bit of coffee grounds as they fall. You then have to clean the counter. Again. And again. And again.

Spring for the Cuisinart, it's worth the difference.

ckeilah


quality posts: 149 Private Messages ckeilah

I disagree. The Cuisinart is even worse! Get this, and be happy with French Press and drip coffee, or get a proper grinder (yes very expensive) and make proper espresso. Or just wimp out and get a Nespresso. ;-)

Please do not increment my Quality Posts count. 69 is a good place to be. ;-)
MOD: We had to...we just HAD TO...

garylehr


quality posts: 5 Private Messages garylehr

Woot's price.. $26.99+5.00 shipping+2.76 tax = $34.75

Amazon with Prime..$34.99+0 shipping+0 tax = $34.99 with 2-day shipping

I know tax isn't your fault, but in this case, woot, your daddy wins out.

nicparadis


quality posts: 1 Private Messages nicparadis

I actually bought this exactly grinder at Cosco several months ago. I returned it two days later for several reasons. 1. It tended to stop up while grinding, requiring alot of fiddling around. 2. As another poster mentioned, it was super messy, requiring more cleanup than expected. Every time you remove the container of ground coffee it dumped on the cupboard. 3. The grounds it made for my french press, even with tinkering with the settings, produced a really muddy, residue-filled coffee. I would put it down to user error of the press except that if I used the coffee ground fresh at the local roaster shop... No muddy residue.

So basically, I would say pass on it if you want it for a French press. It was alright, but not fantastic, for drip coffee.

gregmobile


quality posts: 5 Private Messages gregmobile

Whoever says you have to shake this thing is right. I bought one for my personal drip pot at work, used it probably twice a week, had to shake it every time. The only grind that won't get stuck is coarse press. It broke in under a year, probably owing to the shaking. My crappy blade grinder still works years later. If you aren't a "coffee geek," stick with blade.

bfinkwoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bfinkwoot

Any comments on the chopper?

uhoerhold


quality posts: 11 Private Messages uhoerhold
christybluefish wrote:The deal-killer is that once it finishes and you remove the ground coffee, a fine dusting of coffee drops out onto your counter and onto everything around, as the container IS the bottom of the grinder. There is no ledge or other "bottom" below the container to catch the inevitable last bit of coffee grounds as they fall. You then have to clean the counter. Again. And again. And again.

Spring for the Cuisinart, it's worth the difference.


I agree completely. I have owned both this and the Cuisinart. The coffee dust is the deal-killer for me. For some reason the Krups turns part of the coffee into this dust instead of grinding it all uniformly. If you try making this coffee in a french press, this dust is going to go right through the screen, and you'll end up with a ton of sludge at the bottom of your cup. The Cuisinart gets a very uniform grind, ALL of the coffee gets ground to the level you want.

Pavlina


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Pavlina

Wow, such negativity! I've had one of these for several years, I use it to make espresso every day I am at home. In fact, maybe I lucked outew and got a "good one", but I have to NOT use the finest setting as it will clog my espresso machine. I've had coffee "snobs" drink the eespresso and they always have good things to say. I've never had it get clogged or jammed, never had any plastic bits break or fall off. It does make for a messy counter, but I just figuret it's what you get grinding coffee. I would buy another one of these. For most people, this coffee grinder will work. We only have an espresso machine and a percolator.

Edurne


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Edurne
bfinkwoot wrote:Any comments on the chopper?



The Krups chopper i have now was purchased back in 1990 (obviously not this same model) and i've used it at least a couple of times a week since the day i brought it home...chopping nuts, veggies, grinding spices, even chopping meat. Still using the original bowl and the original blade (i sharpen it occasionally), too.
If this chopper is of the same quality as the one i have then it's worth every penny spent and then some.

If at first you don't succeed, skydiving definitely isn't for you.

magyargirl


quality posts: 14 Private Messages magyargirl

Will either of these work for grinding spices?

jaimelobo


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jaimelobo
christybluefish wrote:I bought this Burr Grinder at Costco for $25 thinking it would be nice to have at the office as it is smaller than the Cuisinart $50 unit I have at home. Mistake.
The reservoir holds maybe 20 "cups" worth of beans (two to three brews-worth of coffee) and you end up having to refill it far more often than you want to...

The whole point of buying whole beans is freshness, if you plan on just leaving them in the grinder, you are somewhat defeating that advantage.

I have the heavy-duty Kitchenaid burr grinder that holds about 1/2 lbs of bean, but I never leave beans in it. I measure what I need for the brew and just grind that.

digitalis303


quality posts: 5 Private Messages digitalis303

So, I had picked up the same negativity on this grinder when I saw it at Costco and looked it up the Amazon reviews. Can anyone suggest a good burr grinder to replace my Braun blade-type for under $100? I am making espresso mostly...

bolligra


quality posts: 33 Private Messages bolligra
digitalis303 wrote:So, I had picked up the same negativity on this grinder when I saw it at Costco and looked it up the Amazon reviews. Can anyone suggest a good burr grinder to replace my Braun blade-type for under $100? I am making espresso mostly...



I bought a Capresso Infinity about a year ago and really like it. Burr grinder, very consistent grinds, and there's a bottom shelf to keep grinds off the counter. I think I paid $70; here's a link at BB&B ($90 before 20% discount), but you can find it in many places, such as Amazon, Seattle Coffee Gear, etc.


As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.

charliecarroll


quality posts: 105 Private Messages charliecarroll
garylehr wrote:Woot's price.. $26.99+5.00 shipping+2.76 tax = $34.75

Amazon with Prime..$34.99+0 shipping+0 tax = $34.99 with 2-day shipping

I know tax isn't your fault, but in this case, woot, your daddy wins out.



I have been ordering from Amazon for quite a while and I thought they took sales tax out on my orders. I'm going to have to go find out now. lol

EDIT: I checked and you are certainly 100% right and Amazon does not take out sales tax when they ship to me. So that brings to question, WOOT, if you are child of Amazon, why do you take out sales tax while daddy does not?

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn
MyPooka wrote:This Krups burr grinder will be fine for people wanting to make drip or French press (press pot) coffee. Absolutely not suitable for espresso regardless of what the manual says.

Over 400 reviews at Amazon with about a two and a half star average rating.

Quite a few reviews over at CoffeeGeek also, but I can tell you from experience that the reviews on grinders there are going to tend to be overly critical for any grinder that isn't a conical or flat burr machine costing many hundreds of dollars. In other words, take the reviews at CG with a big grain of salt.

Generally positive review at YouTube...



Bottom line? If you're wanting to grind for espresso, look elsewhere. If you want to grind fresh beans for your drip machine or press pot, this Krups will work fine.



I've owned a number of cheapo burr grinders and they seem to have the same Chinese mechanism under whatever shell they choose. The part that is exposed looks the same in all cases.

One broke in less than a year, and NONE, and I mean NONE could grind for espresso.

If you need to grind for drip, great. But you probably can get by with an simple blade grinder.

I have a Kitchenaid one that has a larger capacity than most and works for for anything drip. Takes up less space and can be tucked away.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn
bolligra wrote:I bought a Capresso Infinity about a year ago and really like it. Burr grinder, very consistent grinds, and there's a bottom shelf to keep grinds off the counter. I think I paid $70; here's a link at BB&B ($90 before 20% discount), but you can find it in many places, such as Amazon, Seattle Coffee Gear, etc.



I found one of these (used, of course) and it works better than any other relatively cheap ones I have used. Oddly, on fine setting, it seem to grind TOO fine for my Capresso espresso machine and it clogs it! Go figure. Works OK on my La Pavoni.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn
digitalis303 wrote:So, I had picked up the same negativity on this grinder when I saw it at Costco and looked it up the Amazon reviews. Can anyone suggest a good burr grinder to replace my Braun blade-type for under $100? I am making espresso mostly...



I'm not being a smart guy when I say this, but, seriously, no!

There are some hand crank ceramic models on Amazon for around $45. But (if you see my other post) you'll read that many, many of the sub-$100's seem to have the same basic inside mechanism and it simply doesn't grind well enough for espresso.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn
christybluefish wrote:I bought this Burr Grinder at Costco for $25 thinking it would be nice to have at the office as it is smaller than the Cuisinart $50 unit I have at home. Mistake.
The reservoir holds maybe 20 "cups" worth of beans (two to three brews-worth of coffee) and you end up having to refill it far more often than you want to. This alone would be tolerable, however the feed mechanism in the reservoir is finicky enough that you MUST stand guard while it grinds so that you can pick the entire unit up and shake it to continue grinding when it jams.
The deal-killer is that once it finishes and you remove the ground coffee, a fine dusting of coffee drops out onto your counter and onto everything around, as the container IS the bottom of the grinder. There is no ledge or other "bottom" below the container to catch the inevitable last bit of coffee grounds as they fall. You then have to clean the counter. Again. And again. And again.

Spring for the Cuisinart, it's worth the difference.



My Cuisi broke in less than a year (they metal grinding disc actually broke apart!) and never ground fine enough for espresso.

I should have known a $39.95 grinder wasn't up to it. But we all hope for miracles and learn you get what you pay for.

Might as well have a blade grinder.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

mclitchfield


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mclitchfield

I've had this grinder for several years and use it almost every day. It's great, does exactly what you need it to do; however, I paid twice as much for it at Starbucks. Would definitely buy it again, especially at this price.

fjp999


quality posts: 15 Private Messages fjp999
radi0j0hn wrote:I'm not being a smart guy when I say this, but, seriously, no!

There are some hand crank ceramic models on Amazon for around $45. But (if you see my other post) you'll read that many, many of the sub-$100's seem to have the same basic inside mechanism and it simply doesn't grind well enough for espresso.



Was doing research for a friend on grinders & the quality seems to have gone down and prices up in the past few years...

Unless you are using the $500 - 2,000 espresso machines most of the burr grinders will do you fine with the $100 espresso machines. I get a good crema on my espresso machine with a sub $100 burr grinder.

I found a hand crank in my parents house and it is great (but does take some time - sitting, watching tv the night before etc) but then mine is a real antique (lol). The uniformity is amazing and I hear great things about the ones mentioned by radi0j0hn.

Please, Please, Please DO NOT EVER use a blade grinder for coffee beans as the blades start to heat up and actually cook the coffee as you grind away. Blades used for herbs and such are less dense and wont heat up as much.

btw, sometimes if no one is looking you can bring in half a pound of beans into your grocery store and grind them in that machine...

For those French Pressers worried about the bit of powder - look at the Amazing AeroPress. No matter how horrible the coffee is the AeroPress seems to make a pretty decent pressing and clean up is way easier than a old school FP.

giolee88


quality posts: 16 Private Messages giolee88

I use this burr grinder at least 4 times a week. It does the job. contrary to what's been posted here, yes, it grinds just fine for espresso, but I'll be honest, I don't waste my time in the morning making cappucino during the week. In fact, I rarely pull myself shots...I'm just done with it. But it'll be fine enough...albeit not particularly even. The video review is pretty on target.

coffee snobs would point out that it isn't particularly geared for slow grinding, which is true. But trust me...it's not messing with the flavor of the coffee.

Small hopper...yes.

It is a messy grinder--no more messy than literally every grinder I've ever used though (seriously?? we're talking about coffee here. Ever been behind the counter at Charbucks?)

Standard operating procedure: Hit the button. Wait till it stops. BAM!! hit the top of the grinder. Yank the container out and dump it into the filter. Wipe away the crumbs, and re-assemble. Done. It's been like that for years.

If your roaster likes to oil their beans to make them look pretty (or roasts them till their burnt way past vienna so the natural oils come out and coat the surface) you will hate using this (or any) grinder, because the oil clogs up the burrs. It's particularly sensitive on this one bcs it doesn't employ a particularly wide-mouth conical design.

Keep in mind, coffee, once roasted, has a peak freshness on the order of DAYS regardless of packaging, even if you keep it whole bean. It's even shorter after you grind it. So, if you're buying stuff off the shelf, and holding it in your cabinets...add up the number of days it's sat on the shelf at the supermarket, and the number of days it's sat on the shelf in your home. Subtract 5 days, and that's how many days it's past it's prime. If you keep it ground after that, you're just taking away more flavor.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn

It's not a snob thing: to get really good (and efficient) espresso, the grounds must be uniformly fine. Any variation mixed in, and the pressurized water will find it's way around the fine stuff and through the coarse opportunities.

This is assuming you have a pump machine and not a steam power version.

For all other types of making (except Turkish) the cheaper grinders are OK, but perhaps no better than a blade grinder.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

omoomo


quality posts: 15 Private Messages omoomo

I have the Burr Grinder and use it for French Press only.

My two complaints are similar.

1) You on occasion have to shake it to get the beans to hit the grinder, and

2) It's messy...as you pull out the ground container...some ALWAYS ends up on the counter.

In terms of performance for FP...no complaints and my trick for minimizing mess is to grind on a small poly cutting board and then just move to over the sink and dump mess there. Not ideal, but it works.

JasonBartholme


quality posts: 1 Private Messages JasonBartholme

Anyone think this grinder will fare well for grinding spices instead of coffee?

belowi


quality posts: 21 Private Messages belowi

Generally good reviews for the burr grinder at Overstockdotcom where it is selling for almost $50.

http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Krups-GVX1-14-Black-Burr-Coffee-Grinder/4871469/product.html

JesusQuintana


quality posts: 1 Private Messages JesusQuintana

I bought this grinder at costco a while back for $25.
On the plus side, it grinds consistently and it can be set to grind particular amounts so I can just push a button and have enough to exactly fill my reusable k-cup containers however many times I want (with 2 being the minimum).
On the minus side, it's true, this is the messiest grinder I have ever owned and I've been grinding my own beans for 25 years. The coarse/fine setting has to be set all the way to coarse to make it work for the Keurig and it's still a MUCH finer grind than what comes in the pre-ground. I haven't tried it in my espresso machine yet, but with the whole dial towards fine still to go, I'm sure it will make perfect espresso powder.
My one final 'con' comment...is that after about 6 months (I think I've had it about that long) of daily use, the power button has become problematic. It seems to be sticking 'in'. I have to play with it a while to get it to work most days.

dmbauer


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dmbauer
Edurne wrote:The Krups chopper i have now was purchased back in 1990 (obviously not this same model) and i've used it at least a couple of times a week since the day i brought it home...chopping nuts, veggies, grinding spices, even chopping meat. Still using the original bowl and the original blade (i sharpen it occasionally), too.
If this chopper is of the same quality as the one i have then it's worth every penny spent and then some.



Will this grinder, grind poppy seeds?

meghano1989


quality posts: 5 Private Messages meghano1989

Does anybody have experience with the mini chopper? That's what I've got my eye on. I'm sick of chopping veggies, especially onions.

fjp999


quality posts: 15 Private Messages fjp999
giolee88 wrote:
If your roaster likes to oil their beans to make them look pretty (or roasts them till their burnt way past vienna so the natural oils come out and coat the surface) you will hate using this (or any) grinder, because the oil clogs up the burrs. It's particularly sensitive on this one bcs it doesn't employ a particularly wide-mouth conical design.



Forgot to mention...

for a simple cleaning - throw in a small handful of uncooked rice and grind on the filter setting (not espresso grind). This will clean out the grinder of the oils and old coffee pretty well.

After running the rice thru the grinder then run some coffee beans thru. I have some bad, old beans I use for this.

Use the rice cleaning after every few months or so and you will notice a difference (even the static electricity thingy will become a bit less for a while).

giolee88


quality posts: 16 Private Messages giolee88
radi0j0hn wrote:It's not a snob thing: to get really good (and efficient) espresso, the grounds must be uniformly fine. Any variation mixed in, and the pressurized water will find it's way around the fine stuff and through the coarse opportunities.

This is assuming you have a pump machine and not a steam power version.

For all other types of making (except Turkish) the cheaper grinders are OK, but perhaps no better than a blade grinder.

I understand the theory. But blind tasting stuff from this grinder, & the virtuoso I got my uncle yields no real difference in *actual* flavor.

The difference between this and a blade grinder is huge, in that the blade grinder gives you no way of removing ground coffee from the path of the blade, resulting in ultra over-processed pulverized dust, along with your happily ground bits. This is nothing like a blade grinder, except for the fact that the motor is probably shared.