WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

KitchenAid 14Pc Cookware Set - 2 Colors

Speed to First Woot:
4m 29.773s
First Sucker:
LeoCohen
Last Wooter to Woot:
cpa2896
Last Purchase:
2 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 28% of Home Woots
Top 44% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 6% of Home Woots
Top 15% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 24% first woot
  • 8% second woot
  • 31% < 10 woots
  • 20% < 25 woots
  • 18% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 20% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 3% one month old
  • 13% one year old
  • 63% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 99% bought 1
  • 1% bought 2
  • 0% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

3%
3%
2%
1%
1%
1%
3%
7%
6%
5%
7%
6%
7%
6%
5%
5%
3%
4%
5%
4%
4%
5%
2%
4%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


ThunderThighs


quality posts: 569 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff




Some of you may remember how, the last time we sold these, we mixed up the part numbers and sent every single customer the wrong color. Whoops. We've got it worked out now, we promise.





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CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 24 Private Messages CuzzinMerl
ThunderThighs wrote:

Some of you may remember how, the last time we sold these, we mixed up the part numbers and sent every single customer the wrong color. Whoops. We've got it worked out now, we promise.




Yeah, but what was really awkward was how you made me exchange my set with a Wooter named SalMinella.

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind

Any thoughts about the material and quality of the included bakeware? KitchenAid has usually been a fairly good quality brand, but I quickly tire of thin, cheap steel bakeware with easily damaged nonstick coatings. Usually the moment even a tiny bit of the nonstick is damaged they rust like crazy and I just end up throwing them out. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info about them in the description other than "durable nonstick for easy food release and sturdy rolled rims."

I've bought some stainless steel cookie sheets and cake pans to avoid the rust, but the stainless cooks differently than aluminum or thin-steel nonstick, or Pyrex, and the stainless cookie sheets seem to warp in the oven more easily.

Moueska


quality posts: 54 Private Messages Moueska

I know it's an irrational fear, but it feels like moving Danielle and Phil out of the apartment complex is something that could take them out of the home.woot storyline completely.

(aka - initial reaction: NONONONONONONNONONONONONO!!! /BAWLS UNCONTROLLABLY)

Samus


quality posts: 20 Private Messages Samus
kmartind wrote:Any thoughts about the material and quality of the included bakeware? KitchenAid has usually been a fairly good quality brand, but I quickly tire of thin, cheap steel bakeware with easily damaged nonstick coatings. Usually the moment even a tiny bit of the nonstick is damaged they rust like crazy and I just end up throwing them out. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info about them in the description other than "durable nonstick for easy food release and sturdy rolled rims."

I've bought some stainless steel cookie sheets and cake pans to avoid the rust, but the stainless cooks differently than aluminum or thin-steel nonstick, or Pyrex, and the stainless cookie sheets seem to warp in the oven more easily.



I like non-stick cookie sheets (which are usually aluminum) but generally avoid non-stick sauce pans and skillets. It's mostly unnecessary for what you cook on them. Enamel finish is nice for a slow-cooker and certain types of skillets you might cook eggs and bacon on, because they clean easier than cast iron.

IF you have the space, the best thing to do is have a good collection of different material sauce pans and skillets (stainless, enamel, cast iron) and for bake-ware like cake pans and cookie sheets, non-stick is the way to go.

my two cents!

curtisuxor


quality posts: 56 Private Messages curtisuxor
kmartind wrote:Any thoughts about the material and quality of the included bakeware? KitchenAid has usually been a fairly good quality brand, but I quickly tire of thin, cheap steel bakeware with easily damaged nonstick coatings. Usually the moment even a tiny bit of the nonstick is damaged they rust like crazy and I just end up throwing them out. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info about them in the description other than "durable nonstick for easy food release and sturdy rolled rims."

I've bought some stainless steel cookie sheets and cake pans to avoid the rust, but the stainless cooks differently than aluminum or thin-steel nonstick, or Pyrex, and the stainless cookie sheets seem to warp in the oven more easily.



This might help: Link to previous sale on main.woot

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
Samus wrote:I like non-stick cookie sheets (which are usually aluminum) but generally avoid non-stick sauce pans and skillets. It's mostly unnecessary for what you cook on them.
IF you have the space, the best thing to do is have a good collection of different material sauce pans and skillets (stainless, enamel, cast iron) and for bake-ware like cake pans and cookie sheets, non-stick is the way to go.
my two cents!


I've actually almost become converted to parchment paper for cookies (it's a little expensive for what you get though, so I don't use it every time) and I usually grease and flour for other baking, so nonstick is less of an issue.

Given the choice, I'd rather have something that will last and that can be washed in the dishwasher without ruining it over time, which is why I got some stainless steel bakeware, but then discovered it has some potential drawbacks of its own.

I think aluminum without nonstick, but with either parchment or greased/floured actually bakes the best, but you can't, under any circumstances wash that in the dishwasher with the new phosphate-free dishwasher detergents. The new formulas ruin aluminum and turn it gray/black (and it gets black stuff on everything it touches thereafter).

The only workaround for this is to either hand wash aluminum items every time, or use the old-style dishwasher detergent, which seems to still be readily available for restaurants, cafeterias, and businesses as "Cascade Professional Line," but due to new regulations in the past few years, us consumers get stuck with the new stuff that destroys aluminum and also often leaves food on dishes.

rtfirefly


quality posts: 7 Private Messages rtfirefly

Oven safe to 350°? That's not very hot - 350° is really your medium cooking temp; there are a good number of recipes I use that require a hotter temp. 450° would be a lot better.

craigthom


quality posts: 63 Private Messages craigthom
kmartind wrote:I've actually almost become converted to parchment paper for cookies (it's a little expensive for what you get though, so I don't use it every time) and I usually grease and flour for other baking, so nonstick is less of an issue.



If you buy the little rolls of Reynolds parchment paper it is expensive, but if you get big rolls at Costco or a restaurant supply store it's a lot more reasonable.

Another benefit of cooking cookies on parchment is that you can just slide it and the cookies onto a cooling rack.

craigthom


quality posts: 63 Private Messages craigthom
kmartind wrote:Any thoughts about the material and quality of the included bakeware? KitchenAid has usually been a fairly good quality brand, but I quickly tire of thin, cheap steel bakeware with easily damaged nonstick coatings. Usually the moment even a tiny bit of the nonstick is damaged they rust like crazy and I just end up throwing them out. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info about them in the description other than "durable nonstick for easy food release and sturdy rolled rims."

I've bought some stainless steel cookie sheets and cake pans to avoid the rust, but the stainless cooks differently than aluminum or thin-steel nonstick, or Pyrex, and the stainless cookie sheets seem to warp in the oven more easily.



They are described as being aluminum, so they may be cheap and thin but they aren't going to rust.

I use half sheet pans from a restaurant supply store for cookie sheets (I know they are technically jelly roll pans and not cookie sheets because they have a lip, but these do, too). They are cheap, very thick, and hard to warp.

Depending on what I'm cooking, I may use a Silpat, parchment paper, or nothing at all, depending on the job.

A non-stick surface just won't produce biscuits the way I want them. Those need to be cooked on bare, shiny aluminum.

The Silpat is, in the long run, more economical than parchment paper, since it's a one-time expense, but some things don't brown well enough on it. I use it more often to line the pan when I'm using it to catch drips from something above it.

charliecarroll


quality posts: 105 Private Messages charliecarroll

A deal killer for me. I quite often use 375 and 400.

shadyninja


quality posts: 2 Private Messages shadyninja

Is it just me or do the pans look exactly like the Rachael Ray ones?

http://home.woot.com/offers/rachael-ray-13-pc-porcelain-ii-cookware-2

lovesjohnmayer


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lovesjohnmayer

do not buy nonstick teflon pans, they are going to be banned by 2015 by the US Government.
http://teflon.whocanisue.com

http://www.divinecaroline.com/38/78130-ten-products-ban-home-forever

ylenroc


quality posts: 5 Private Messages ylenroc
kmartind wrote:Any thoughts about the material and quality of the included bakeware? KitchenAid has usually been a fairly good quality brand, but I quickly tire of thin, cheap steel bakeware with easily damaged nonstick coatings. Usually the moment even a tiny bit of the nonstick is damaged they rust like crazy and I just end up throwing them out. There doesn't seem to be a lot of info about them in the description other than "durable nonstick for easy food release and sturdy rolled rims."

I've bought some stainless steel cookie sheets and cake pans to avoid the rust, but the stainless cooks differently than aluminum or thin-steel nonstick, or Pyrex, and the stainless cookie sheets seem to warp in the oven more easily.



I got this set as a Christmas gift last month (even got the right one - red was ordered, red was received) and I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of the bakeware. The pieces are heavy and sturdy, at least compared to the cheap-ish stuff that I had picked up at Bed Bath and Beyond. I considered the bakeware pieces a bonus, and it turned out to be a nice bonus indeed.

mgilmer54


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mgilmer54

Anybody know where these are made? If in China, thats a no go for me. I never buy or use anything made in China that touches my food.

lovesjohnmayer


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lovesjohnmayer
mgilmer54 wrote:Anybody know where these are made? If in China, thats a no go for me. I never buy or use anything made in China that touches my food.



scroll about half way down this page....http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/KitchenAid-Porcelain-Red-12-piece-Nonstick-Cookware-Set/5877969/product.html?cid=202290&kid=9553000357392&track=pspla&ef_id=UKcZ6gAAH5SW6EuG:20130107152846:s


MADE IN CHINA

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
lovesjohnmayer wrote:do not buy nonstick teflon pans, they are going to be banned by 2015 by the US Government.


You're seriously linking to a site called WhoCanISue.com?

In any case, keep in mind that:
1. Teflon is still considered safe, even by the EPA, etc, in cookware when used properly (which basically just means not overheating it, and tossing it if it starts to flake off over time).
2. Nonstick doesn't always equal Teflon. You might have noticed a lot of cookware in the last couple of years starting to say PFOA-free nonstick. Those don't contain the chemical in question (but in some cases also don't perform as well).

The coatings on these particular pans do appear somewhat likely to have been manufactured with PFOA, but that mostly means don't leave a frying pan unattended on the stove because you'll ruin the coating and possibly release potentially harmful vapors if you overheat them (in addition to the typical filling your kitchen with smoke, setting off smoke detectors, and perhaps starting a fire (not to mention ruining your breakfast), that could occur with any pan).

Edit: Statement from the EPA:
"Are there steps that consumers can take to reduce their exposure to PFOA?
Consumer products made with perfluorochemicals include some non-stick cookware and products such as breathable, all-weather clothing. They are also employed in hundreds of other uses in almost all industry segments, including the aerospace, automotive, building/construction, chemical processing, electrical and electronics, semiconductor, and textile industries. Telomers are used as surfactants and as surface treatment chemicals in many products, including fire fighting foams; personal care and cleaning products; and oil, stain, grease, and water repellent coatings on carpet, textiles, leather, and paper. Consumer products made with fluoropolymers and fluorinated telomers, such as Teflon and other trademark products, are not PFOA. PFOA is used as a processing aid in the manufacture of fluoropolymers and can be also be produced by the breakdown of some fluorinated telomers. The information that EPA has available does not indicate that the routine use of consumer products poses a concern. At present, there are no steps that EPA recommends that consumers take to reduce exposures to PFOA."
http://www.epa.gov/oppt/pfoa/pubs/faq.html

lmensor


quality posts: 6 Private Messages lmensor

As I said last time this set was offered, I've had it for years and love it. The non-stick has stayed non-stick with no issues. It can practically be wiped clean with a paper towel. Love the red.

CaptainTr1pps


quality posts: 15 Private Messages CaptainTr1pps

Man, I'm in the market for a new set of decent cookware, was almost decided on a Cuisinart stainless steel set from Amazon, which is about 50 dollars more than this, and minus the bakeware. I'm used to non-stick and cast iron, so seeing this....

Question - do the pot lids fit the skillets?

indysharpei


quality posts: 0 Private Messages indysharpei

I've read a couple of reviews elsewhere claiming that the red paint/coating chipped off very easily... Has anyone had that problem?

amstone7


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amstone7

I ordered the black set for Christmas and love them. I received red but the Woot customer service was wonderful and took care of it right away. Very happy with my purchase.

smartheart


quality posts: 94 Private Messages smartheart

I'm a little confused about the material used to achieve non-stick on the various pieces in this set.

There's a reference to "porcelain enamel" covering the aluminum surface at one point. And non-stick coating at another.

Another question: these are aluminum but non annodized, right?

Can someone disperse the mists for me, please?


"Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne."
--D. Parker

CaptainTr1pps


quality posts: 15 Private Messages CaptainTr1pps

You know what, I think I'll get this, then maybe a stainless steel pot or pan, and teach myself how to use those, rather than replacing everything at once and ruining the new set the first week.

daddyeu


quality posts: 0 Private Messages daddyeu

very nice cookware. already have one set but not this many pc's..shopped around and got the best deal I could find at 129.

MrWizard1923


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MrWizard1923
mgilmer54 wrote:Anybody know where these are made? If in China, thats a no go for me. I never buy or use anything made in China that touches my food.



Then you must eat with your fingers since there is no flatware made in the US anymore - not even Fiesta.

MrWizard1923


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MrWizard1923
shadyninja wrote:Is it just me or do the pans look exactly like the Rachael Ray ones?

http://home.woot.com/offers/rachael-ray-13-pc-porcelain-ii-cookware-2



There's a reason they look alike - they're made by the same company, Meyer - who also make Circulon, Anolon, Farberware, Rachael Ray, Paula Deen, SilverStone and KitchenAid cookware.

meanjoeira


quality posts: 4 Private Messages meanjoeira
rtfirefly wrote:Oven safe to 350°? That's not very hot - 350° is really your medium cooking temp; there are a good number of recipes I use that require a hotter temp. 450° would be a lot better.



Total killer. Maybe in some sort of specialty pan, but in any type of workhorse, let alone a set, no way is that acceptable, even assuming that it's not true for the bakeware (though this isn't clear).

jweb1510


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jweb1510

I'd buy the 4 pots and corresponding lids for $50, but I don't want to pay an extra $40 for two cookie sheets and two cake pans that can't withstand heat greater than 350º and two skillets that I don't need. Woot, split the set up when you go to re-hash this deal in a few weeks!!

lmensor


quality posts: 6 Private Messages lmensor
indysharpei wrote:I've read a couple of reviews elsewhere claiming that the red paint/coating chipped off very easily... Has anyone had that problem?



No, I have not had that problem and I've had them in red for a couple of years now.