WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

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Crock-Pot 7-Quart Slow Cooker

Speed to First Woot:
19m 19.550s
First Sucker:
gerandbil
Last Wooter to Woot:
Rinney
Last Purchase:
9 months ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 14% of Home Woots
Top 20% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 3% of Home Woots
Top 8% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 25% first woot
  • 7% second woot
  • 21% < 10 woots
  • 19% < 25 woots
  • 28% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 21% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 10% one year old
  • 67% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 95% bought 1
  • 4% bought 2
  • 2% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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0%
3%
8%
9%
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9%
7%
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5%
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Woots by State

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Quality Posts


wootstalkerbot


quality posts: 13 Private Messages wootstalkerbot




Crock-Pot 7-Quart Slow Cooker
Price: $19.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard OR $15 Two-Day OR $18 One-Day
Shipping Estimates: Ships in 1-2 business days (Tuesday, Jan 21 to Wednesday, Jan 22) + transit
Condition: New

Buy It Search Amazon Search Google

Previous Similar Sales (May not be exact model)
1/16/2014 - $19.99 (Woot-off) - 0 comment(s)
12/19/2013 - $19.99 (Woot-off) - 6 comment(s)
12/6/2013 - $19.99 - 41 comment(s)


1/3/2014 - $19.99 (Woot Plus)

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lrgraham14


quality posts: 8 Private Messages lrgraham14

Crock-Pot 7-Quart Slow Cooker
Price: $19.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard or $15 Two-Day or $18 One-Day
Condition: New

Comparison Links:
Google Products - Amazon - Previous Woot Sales


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lichme


quality posts: 3023 Private Messages lichme

See what's cooking on the Product Page
Good feedback from some Amazon Users

mrunnertville


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mrunnertville

Uh oh, lrgraham's stuck on repeat. Somebody give him a whack and move him to the next track please-I'm getting sick of this song.

StarBob


quality posts: 15 Private Messages StarBob

Seems like every time they show a slow cooker image the thing is overfilled.

acanarelli


quality posts: 251 Private Messages acanarelli

We have a crock pot...someplace. But it would probably take a month of Sundays to find it because I never use it and my wife rarely uses it. So it would probably save a lot of time for me to just buy this one because I love stew. Which brings me to a question, which I hope someone would answer for me...

The idea of a crock pot, I am told, is to put all the ingredients in the cooker in the morning and leave it to do its stuff. When you get back in the evening, you're just in time for a great dinner of hot stew...love it. However, my question is, how do you get the meat cubes to be just right tender without having the vegetables turn to unappetizing mush?

aderyn


quality posts: 10 Private Messages aderyn
acanarelli wrote:
The idea of a crock pot, I am told, is to put all the ingredients in the cooker in the morning and leave it to do its stuff. When you get back in the evening, you're just in time for a great dinner of hot stew...love it. However, my question is, how do you get the meat cubes to be just right tender without having the vegetables turn to unappetizing mush?



Interestingly, they tend to work just the opposite; vegetables take longer than meat. Something to do with the moist heat. Also, be selective about your choice of meat. For example, chuck roast, with its fat and connective tissue, fares better with long, moist cooking than, say, cubes of round steak, which turn out very dry in a slow cooker.

db7


quality posts: 1 Private Messages db7

According to Amazon customer reviews, this particular slow cooker is way too hot even on the lowest setting; and it is not 7 qt as it claims, but closer to 6 qt.

richrauch


quality posts: 0 Private Messages richrauch
db7 wrote:According to Amazon customer reviews, this particular slow cooker is way too hot even on the lowest setting; and it is not 7 qt as it claims, but closer to 6 qt.



I was ready to buy this one because our 6-qt is sometimes too small. But, if this one actually holds only 6.25 quarts, forget it. Thanks for pointing that out.

wellwooted


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wellwooted
StarBob wrote:Seems like every time they show a slow cooker image the thing is overfilled.



Oh! Heavens NO, Bob!

captrespect


quality posts: 0 Private Messages captrespect
aderyn wrote:Interestingly, they tend to work just the opposite; vegetables take longer than meat. Something to do with the moist heat. Also, be selective about your choice of meat. For example, chuck roast, with its fat and connective tissue, fares better with long, moist cooking than, say, cubes of round steak, which turn out very dry in a slow cooker.



Also, always give the meat a good sear before tossing it in. Adds to the flavor and helps it hold up a bit for the long cooking.

lurcher


quality posts: 8 Private Messages lurcher
richrauch wrote:I was ready to buy this one because our 6-qt is sometimes too small. But, if this one actually holds only 6.25 quarts, forget it. Thanks for pointing that out.



What is happening is crap marketing from the manufacturers - they say 7 qt if you fill it all the way up, but in their instructions they say you should NOT fill it this full - so usable is ~6 as stated by others. You can even look on the bottom of the ceramic pot and it typically states 6 qt.

Been driving my wife nuts, as she really wants a huge one (8-10 qt) for making multiple meals at once

chris396


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chris396
db7 wrote:According to Amazon customer reviews, this particular slow cooker is way too hot even on the lowest setting; and it is not 7 qt as it claims, but closer to 6 qt.



My biggest complaint with 90% of slow cookers is they all cook way too hot. I have an Instant Pot pressure/slow cooker that actually works as a slow cooker. It's the only one I've ever found that doesn't just boil everything for 8 hours. I think I paid around $120 for it so it's not cheap.

enaych


quality posts: 5 Private Messages enaych
acanarelli wrote:The idea of a crock pot, I am told, is to put all the ingredients in the cooker in the morning and leave it to do its stuff. When you get back in the evening, you're just in time for a great dinner of hot stew...love it. However, my question is, how do you get the meat cubes to be just right tender without having the vegetables turn to unappetizing mush?



Or use it overnight. I've been using mine quite a bit lately to make oatmeal with steel cut oats. There are a number of recipes online. It just beats any other oatmeal without contest. I make a big batch, then stick the extra in the fridge reheating single servings with a little extra water or milk throughout the week.

I also recently tried roasting a whole chicken in one and was very happy with the tender results, though it was a bit awkward getting it out of the pot. Think next time I'll just do a whole chicken cut up.

Might as well have a signature now since I have something to put into it.

SavingSista


quality posts: 0 Private Messages SavingSista

Good price. Too bad I just got a (smaller) Crock Pot for Christmas. I guess there's nothing wrong with having multiples.

sdc100


quality posts: 506 Private Messages sdc100
acanarelli wrote:We have a crock pot...someplace. But it would probably take a month of Sundays to find it because I never use it and my wife rarely uses it. So it would probably save a lot of time for me to just buy this one because I love stew. Which brings me to a question, which I hope someone would answer for me...

The idea of a crock pot, I am told, is to put all the ingredients in the cooker in the morning and leave it to do its stuff. When you get back in the evening, you're just in time for a great dinner of hot stew...love it. However, my question is, how do you get the meat cubes to be just right tender without having the vegetables turn to unappetizing mush?



The easy answer is to choose veggies that won't turn to mush if you plan to slow cook all day. The most common is, of course, carrots. Beans are also popular. Because the heat is so low, many veggies that you'd expect to be mushy hold up pretty well. Classic slow cookers from the 70's and 80's only used 75 watts on Low for all day cooking. Current ones use much more electricity (800+ watts?) to reach safe temperature quickly, but are thermostatically off more than on.

One trick some people use to stack the ingredients in layers. The lowest ingredients, submerged in liquid, get exposed to the most heat. The topmost ingredients is exposed to lower temperature from steam only. You can even use a rack to raise ingredients you don't want exposed to liquid.

sdc100


quality posts: 506 Private Messages sdc100
chris396 wrote:My biggest complaint with 90% of slow cookers is they all cook way too hot. I have an Instant Pot pressure/slow cooker that actually works as a slow cooker. It's the only one I've ever found that doesn't just boil everything for 8 hours. I think I paid around $120 for it so it's not cheap.



Companies now set their slow cooker to cook so hot because they want to avoid lawsuits from food poisoning. In the 70s and 80s', Crockpots used on 75 watts on Low and 150 watts on High. At the low setting, the liquid barely reached a simmer. With constant heat, classic Crockpots resemble a gas stove on low. That raised fears of food poisoning as the pot very slowly reached its highest temperature. All Crockpots now use about 800 watts or so to reach a quick boil and then use a thermostat to cycle the heat on/off. And the temperature has been set to be much higher.

sdc100


quality posts: 506 Private Messages sdc100
lurcher wrote:What is happening is crap marketing from the manufacturers - they say 7 qt if you fill it all the way up, but in their instructions they say you should NOT fill it this full - so usable is ~6 as stated by others. You can even look on the bottom of the ceramic pot and it typically states 6 qt.

Been driving my wife nuts, as she really wants a huge one (8-10 qt) for making multiple meals at once



In their defense, this is often the accepted way to measure capacity. When they say that a microwave oven is 1.5 cubic feet, for example, that doesn't mean you should fill the entire oven up. That's even true of normal pots. If you filled it with liquid to the brim, it'll boil over. In other words, the spec is just spatial capacity, not necessarily usable capacity.